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10 Shortest Grandmaster Defeats E-mail
Written by Yury Markushin   
Tuesday, 21 January 2014 17:37

10 shortest grandmaster gamesIf you think chess masters don't make mistakes in their games, you should review these 10 shortest games. Many of them ended up with a checkmate, all under 12 moves. This is not a compilation of GM blunders as I presented in Top 10 Biggest Blunders Grandmasters Made at Chess, but rather a compilation of short games lost by the strong players.

Here it is, for you to judge.


Game 1: N. Tchinenoff - R. Maillard (Paris, 1925) Game 2: R. Reti - S. Tartakower (Vienna, 1910)

Game 3: NN - Du Mont (1802) Game 5: C. Gurnhill - H. Banks (St. Louis, 1984)

Game 6: G. Greco - NN (1620)

Game 7: Deming - Cornell (Indiana, 1980)

Game 8: Barney - Mccrum (Dayton, 1969) Game 9: D. Andreikin - S. Karjakin (Moscow, 2010)

Game 10: A. Zapata - V. Anand (Biel, 1988)

Don't forget to leave a comment on these games!

If you like these games you might want to check out the following items:

Credits:

Image in this article is from Flickr and used under the creative commons license.

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Last Updated on Wednesday, 25 January 2017 15:05
 

Comments  

 
-1 #32 Chessguy007 2016-01-06 10:30
The title is a bit misleading. It should be named the shortest GMs losses and wins...
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+2 #31 Alessandro Gil 2015-05-30 01:51
About interesting game 9: There's a comment that 7...Nxd4 would gain a piece. But what about 8.Bxe7 !? Black queen would be trapped...
By the way, the article mentions GM blunders, but there's even one "NN"! ;-)
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-1 #30 Kick 2015-05-05 15:55
Karpov lost a game to Christiansen in about 10 moves to a simple yet not often seen piece fork.
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0 #29 Demian 2015-01-19 12:57
If white moves D5 after blacks moves Qe2?
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0 #28 Nick Antoniadis 2015-01-19 07:18
Quoting BugHousePlayer101:
Quoting Sanjay:
Quoting Sherlock Holmes:
In the last game what would happen if Anand had played Qe7 after Qe2?

Nd5

... After Nd5 Qd7 because the knight was attacking the blundered piece but no more


Then d3 and the piece is gone
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+1 #27 BugHousePlayer101 2014-11-27 10:50
Quoting Sanjay:
Quoting Sherlock Holmes:
In the last game what would happen if Anand had played Qe7 after Qe2?

Nd5

... After Nd5 Qd7 because the knight was attacking the blundered piece but no more
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+1 #26 Yury 2014-10-23 13:42
Losing a piece usually means losing the game, even on 1700 level :roll:
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+3 #25 Philip Kim 2014-10-18 23:38
(For game 10) Does losing a minor piece for nothing really merit a forfeit at the GM level?
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+1 #24 CHERGUI Fathi 2014-10-18 10:12
Blunders in chess are expected !!
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+1 #23 Sanjay 2014-10-10 15:01
Quoting Sherlock Holmes:
In the last game what would happen if Anand had played Qe7 after Qe2?

Nd5
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