English Chinese (Simplified) German Hindi Romanian Russian Spanish

21 Days to Supercharge Your Chess

SUPERCHARGE YOUR CHESS
Give me 21 Days and I Will Show You How to
Become a Dramatically Better Chess Player

Chess Talk

Chess Players Online:

We have 298 guests online
pogonina

ideas behind openings

13 Checkmates You Must Know E-mail
Written by Yury Markushin   
Sunday, 17 January 2010 16:51
Article Index
13 Checkmates You Must Know
Page 2
Page 3
Page 4
All Pages

checkmate in chessAs we all know, the ultimate goal of chess is to deliver a checkmate.  Fortunately not all checkmates in chess are as complicated as the one discussed here. Today we’ll focus on 13 most common checkmates in chess. You should always look to setup one while playing a game and also be aware of these structures in order to avoid nasty surprises prepared by your opponents.

By looking at this positions you will learn basic checkmating patterns and will train your ming to  create and find similar position in your own games.

White to move  in each position.


Two major pieces back rank mate

This is by far the simplest possible mate in the game of chess, which usually occurs in the late stages of the game (i. e. endgame). Stronger side cuts the opponents King from 7th rank with one major piece and delivers a mate with the other one.  One the diagram above white mates with 1.Ra8#. This mate is very common and thus important to know and to be aware of.

two rooks mate

Note: If the opponent’s king is stuck in the middle of the board, the stronger side should “walk” him onto the 8th rank to the shown position by given interchangeable checks with the rooks, and then mating on the back rank.


Two  Pawn checkmate

This is a very common endgame, where one side has two pawns and the other side has none.  On the positions above, Black has nowhere to move: d7 and f7 are guarded by the White’s King; d8 and f8 are guarded by the e7 pawn which obviously cannot be captured.

two pawn mate

If it were Black to move, White would feel silly since it is a stalemate – a draw. However in this case it is White to move and mate in one:  1.d7#.

This mate is also often occurs in more complex positions with other pawns and pieces present on the board.


Back rank checkmate

This is a classical example of the back rank checkmate which is a very powerful weapon which is used by all players as a serious weapon or a threat.  In the position above Black’s King is blocked by his own pawns on the 8th rank (i. e. back rank) and any check by a major piece on the back rank would turn out deadly.

back rank checkmate

If we take a look at the White’s pawn structure it is pretty similar to the Black’s with one big exception:  h – pawn is advanced from h2 to h3 freeing and escape square or an escape window on h2, illuminating back rank checkmate threat.

White continues with 1. Ra8# delivering checkmate in one.

Note: You should be always aware of the back rank threats even when no immediate checkmate is available, position can change very rapidly and therefore it is a good practice to create an escape window in the endgame where major pieces are present.

Tip: There are a lot of cases of the back rank mate in the Middle game also.



"There Are 3 Main Problems That 95% of All Chess Players Are Facing... "

start winning at chess

You will instantly discover how you can significantly improve your game, adding hundreds of elo points without hiring an expensive chess coach or spending 5 hours a day on chess !


Click Here to Start Your Training

Last Updated on Saturday, 19 March 2011 00:25
 

Comments  

 
0 #19 Millie 2015-12-06 17:17
Awesome! ;-)
Quote | Report to administrator
 
 
-4 #18 Scionescire 2014-09-27 16:58
Quoting Chris:
It should be possible to mate with 2 knights on an open board. Opponent's king at A1, your king at A3, knights at C2 and C3.

The position is mate, agreed. But you cannot ENFORCE it in a game. Assume the last move was Nb4-c2+. Before this, black must have moved his K to a1. Hence this K had to come from b1, as a2/b2 are covered by the white K. So white may have moved Nb5-c3+ before. But black is not forced to move to a1, he could as well move away. From any nontrivial position white can only mate if black helps him...
Quote | Report to administrator
 
 
-2 #17 Mauro 2014-09-27 14:56
Quoting Chris:
It should be possible to mate with 2 knights on an open board. Opponent's king at A1, your king at A3, knights at C2 and C3.


No, only is possible if the black pieces has a pawn in the board
Quote | Report to administrator
 
 
+1 #16 Dan Burns 2014-09-27 08:43
The two pawn checkmate, as given in this article, is an impossibility. It is White's move, but what was Black's last move, and what was White's last move that caused Black's response? In the position given, White had to have been on e7, so what move did White make that caused Black to move Ke8?
Quote | Report to administrator
 
 
-2 #15 P.K.Rajendhran 2014-09-12 07:35
1.Common one!
2. How black chose move to e8?There could have more options for Black king when both pawns are advancing!( Queening of pawn& mating is different matter)
3.I feel it is rather uncommon on black's side
Quote | Report to administrator
 
 
-2 #14 Jesse 2014-06-06 23:31
Quoting James:
The two pawn checkmate scenario you have captioned is not possible. It cannot be white to move, because there is no move that black could have made to end up in that position.


I guess I should point out that the position said it was invalid and only an example. Read captions guys.. it's a good skill. Also being too nitpicky is bad.
Quote | Report to administrator
 
 
+5 #13 Peter Bodziony 2014-01-25 15:21
Quoting James:
The two pawn checkmate scenario you have captioned is not possible. It cannot be white to move, because there is no move that black could have made to end up in that position.


Of course it is possible. The position would occur for ex. After a pawn takes pawn capture with a check, black moving to the current square and white check mating.
that is not what would have happened on a practical game, yet certainly possible.
Quote | Report to administrator
 
 
+4 #12 Yury 2013-09-20 09:12
Quoting James:
The two pawn checkmate scenario you have captioned is not possible. It cannot be white to move, because there is no move that black could have made to end up in that position.

Good point James, I looked at it and it seems like the position is not achievable.

It can work as a general example of checkmate though. I can add a black pawn on, say, a5 to make it more realistic ;-)
Quote | Report to administrator
 
 
+5 #11 James 2013-09-19 19:57
The two pawn checkmate scenario you have captioned is not possible. It cannot be white to move, because there is no move that black could have made to end up in that position.
Quote | Report to administrator
 
 
+1 #10 Not you 2012-12-12 17:31
Check out Wikipedia or some other such website to find out from what positions there is a forced checkmate or not. As fr 'hardcore' checkmates, one is mentioned in the article about the 50 move rule. From a certain position, King, Queen and Knight versus King, Knight, Bishop and Rook takes 517 moves for a piece to be taken (with best play). Alternatively, the section on 'under-promotions' gives some interesting examples.
Quote | Report to administrator
 

Add comment

Please offer your feedback for the article here. Don't worry, your comment will appear shortly after approval. Only SPAM and abusive comments will be deleted.


Security code
Refresh