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10 reasons play alekhine defense
FM Zaur Tekeyev
04.09.2021
FM Zaur Tekeyev
The Alekhine Defense is the most famous example of a provocative opening. Black meets 1.e4 with 1…Nf6, attacking the central pawn on move 1 and inviting it to move farther. It is well-known pawns cannot go backward and hence leave weaknesses behind themselves. Still, it is quite a common scenario when White starts pursuing that knight with their pawns, grabbing as much space as possible but ends up losing the game badly because of overextending.
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richter veresov attack
Editor
03.28.2021
Rony
When someone asks something like, “Hey, I just want to have some fun—and still win games. Which opening should I learn?”... The answer is usually to AVOID the great, old Sicilian or the totally unoriginal King’s Pawn, or any of the popular openings that you constantly hear about for that matter.
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evaluation-of-positions
Editor
03.28.2021
Rony
Yes, choosing the right candidate move can make or break your position… true that. But what’s even more important? What’s the FIRST step that comes even before looking for candidate moves? That’s right—evaluation of the current position.
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vienna-game
Editor
03.12.2021
Rony
Ask any chess beginner rated around 1400-1600… and they will tell you what’s on top of their mind. It’s almost always along these lines: “How to find the best moves in a position?”  “How to visualize the chess board better?” And more often than not…
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TCW Exclusives
Training Tips
Unexpected Moves
WGM Raluca Sgîrcea, IM Renier Castellanos
WGM Raluca Sgîrcea, IM Renier Castellanos
“I can’t play this move because my opponent can capture it” – How many times have you heard a chess player say this? How many times have you said it yourself? There are many positions where we believe a move is not possible by default though. Our subconscious tells us that it is not possible to move to a specific square because our opponent is defending it with more than one piece or more than one pawn.
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8 Questions to Ask Analyzing Your Own Games
WGM Raluca Sgîrcea, IM Renier Castellanos
WGM Raluca Sgîrcea, IM Renier Castellanos
It is common knowledge that the key to making progress in chess is the consistent and deep analysis of your own games. Once you have learned the most typical nuances of positional play and tactics, it is worth finding out what you miss in your own practice. It is necessary to try to get to the source of your mistakes and learn more about your own strengths and weaknesses.
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Improving Calculation for Club Players
GM Alex Colovic
06.22.2018
GM Alex Colovic
Chess is tactics. More than one strong player has said some variation of this truth. What does that mean? In simple words, it means that if you are not careful you will lose a pawn or a piece. How do you become careful then? It all starts with board awareness. At all times you should know what is happening on the board. Where the pieces are, how they interact with each other. This awareness should be “on” at all times – don’t “forget” a piece or a pawn just because you’re calculating a sequence of moves on the other side of the board.
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