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improving calculation for club-players.
GM Alex Colovic
06.22.2018
GM Alex Colovic
Chess is tactics. More than one strong player has said some variation of this truth. What does that mean? In simple words, it means that if you are not careful you will lose a pawn or a piece. How do you become careful then? It all starts with board awareness. At all times you should know what is happening on the board. Where the pieces are, how they interact with each other. This awareness should be “on” at all times – don’t “forget” a piece or a pawn just because you’re calculating a sequence of moves on the other side of the board.
Training Tips
5 Things Every Chess Player Should Start Doing
Yury Markushin
09.15.2017
Yury Markushin
Over 99% of chess players play way under their maximum performance rating. Wouldn’t it be great if you could simply flip a switch and your chess performance goes up? Unfortunately, it doesn’t work like that, otherwise, everyone would’ve been a Grandmaster already. Don’t get upset though, because there are some things that I cover that act exactly as that magic switch. You won’t become a grandmaster or even a master overnight, but if you implement even some of the advice given here you will notice you start making progress [especially if you are stuck and not improving].
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Chess Training According to GM Alex Colovic
GM Alex Colovic
05.18.2018
GM Alex Colovic
A game of chess is a complex affair. It starts long before the first move has been played. It starts at home. For chess, the wise words of Benjamin Franklin, “By failing to prepare, you are preparing to fail” are applicable to the fullest. But how do you prepare? For now we will leave the psychological aspect out (and for those needing a shortcut here’s another famous quote, this time from Bobby Fischer: “All things being equal, confidence wins games.”) and we shall concentrate on the more technical aspects of training concerning the three main phases of the game – the opening, the middlegame, and the endgame.
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5 Most Useful Chess Skills You Can Learn in 5 Days
WGM Raluca Sgîrcea, IM Renier Castellanos
08.07.2017
WGM Raluca Sgîrcea, IM Renier Castellanos
In order to improve at chess every player must work hard and invest some daily time and effort. There are many things you can work on, from openings to endgame, tactics and the middlegame. However, there are  few basic skills one must develop and constantly train. The consistency of training is perhaps one of the single most important things a chess player can do in order to be successful. Similarly to exercising in a gym, working on your game is a process. The improvement will be gradual, but definite if you keep applying yourself. Here are the 5 most useful chess skills you can learn in just 5 days!

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Opening Tips
The 3…Qa5 Scandinavian:  Play it Safely and Aggressively
WGM Raluca Sgîrcea, IM Renier Castellanos
08.19.2015
WGM Raluca Sgîrcea, IM Renier Castellanos
For every 1.e4 player, the Scandinavian has always been an awkward defense to meet. Not because it is especially dangerous for white, but because the mainlines in which white is meant to obtain a theoretical advantage are quite complicated and difficult to remember. Being a defense seldom seen in practice, it makes it even more difficult to try the current theory.
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8 Chess Openings Played by Magnus Carlsen
Yury Markushin
11.14.2016
Yury Markushin
Every player wants to play like famous Magnus Carlsen. We saw him crashing his competition, winning tournament after tournament and match after match. He has many perks including photographic memory, super-human IQ and ability to stay focused for 6-7 hours straight.That’s not the only reason he is so successful. His opening preparation has to do a lot with many of his wins. Today we will take a look at 8 chess openings that help Calrsen stay on top of the rating list and keep the World Championship title.
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Playing against the French Defense – Guimard Variation
WGM Raluca Sgîrcea, IM Renier Castellanos
05.15.2017
WGM Raluca Sgîrcea, IM Renier Castellanos
The Guimard variation of the French Defense starts with the move 3…Nc6 against white’s solid 3.Nd2 known as the Tarrasch variation. Black’s idea is quite simple, but also logical. First, he develops a piece with tempo, attacking the center. When white defends the d4 pawn, say with 4.Ngf3, then he plays another developing move and renews the attack on the center with 4…Nf6.  
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