Latest Posts

Yury Markushin
08.05.2011
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Yury Markushin
08.05.2011

Chess is a kind of game that even Kings themselves played in the past. It is a common knowledge that Indian Shahs ended their territorial wars due to the invention of chess. They were able to decide their disputes by the brain power translated into pieces’ moves on the chess board rather than by pointless wars. Even though the rules of the game and chess soldiers were a little different from ones used in the modern game the ultimate goal stayed unchanged for thousands of years: to checkmate the enemy’s King. Obviously the Shahs and Kings played on very expensive boards made out of gold and silver and crafted with diamonds and other precious stones.

Yury Markushin
08.02.2011
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Yury Markushin
08.02.2011

Rook endgames are the most common type of endgames there is in the game of chess. These endgames take place in about 50% of all games. If you are a tournament chess player and wish to improve your results in the future, the rook endgame is something to look at more deeply. Rook endgames are not something that can be played intuitively; there are many positions where you need to make ‘strange looking’ or ‘counter-intuitive moves’ to win or draw the game.

Yury Markushin
07.29.2011
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Yury Markushin
07.29.2011

A lot of players ask how to make good decisions at chess. It seems to be an easy question to answer but, actually it isn’t. What is very obvious for one player may be very subtle for the other one.

One chess player asked me recently how do I look at the board and how do I deal with threats? What do I do when I’m under attack? Is there a systematic approach dealing with all these things? These are actually very deep and fundamental questions which may or may not have a single right answer.

Yury Markushin
07.16.2011
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Yury Markushin
07.16.2011

I have written many articles on the topics of improvement at chess, becoming a better chess player and beating a stronger opponent at chess. Throughout that time I was getting mostly positive responses from the readers. Some agreed with the ideas I presented, some were pretty skeptical at first but then tend to share my thoughts, some completely disagreed (not many, but I cannot completely ignore this category as well).

Regardless of the category you belong to, you may ask does the methods and ideas recommended throughout this website work at all? Am I going to become a stronger chess player if I follow your guidelines? And you’re right, you should be critical and question the information you’re being exposed to.

In today’s article I will show and analyze one of my recent “officially rated” chess games that I played against a National Master (FIDE ~ 2250) and managed to win it using techniques I advocate.

Yury Markushin
07.07.2011
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Yury Markushin
07.07.2011

Chess is a very complex game. Playing high quality moves is a very difficult task to achieve and the ability to pick the best moves is art, which requires many hours to master. Have you ever find yourself in a position, while playing a game of chess, when it seems like you don’t know at all what move should you make on the board. You think, well should I make this move or that move and you feel lost in the position and totally don’t know what to play? If you do you should feel happy for two reasons. First of all, you’re not alone, many novice players don’t know what to play (yes this article aims mostly novice chess players, since when Masters don’t know what move to make it a completely different story, but even they can learn something here). The second reason you should feel happy, because you were fortunate enough to stumble upon this article which will solve the issue (hopefully).

Yury Markushin
07.02.2011
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Yury Markushin
07.02.2011

You probably know what chess is. If you do, you most likely know how chess pieces move and which pieces are worth what.

However, what you may not know is why they are worth that much and how to efficiently use them to win more games. You may not know these simple facts and ideas that are applicable to chess pieces. Intrigued? Read on…

Yury Markushin
06.26.2011
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Yury Markushin
06.26.2011

Have you ever noticed that it is easy to play against some chess players and it’s is almost impossible to beat the other ones. You may say, of course some players are weaker and thus easier to play against, some players are stronger and thus harder to play against. But did you ask yourself a question why is this player considered strong while the other one is weak. Is that because he has openings encyclopedia build into his head, Nalimov’s endgames tables let him play perfect endgame or he can calculate zillions moves ahead? Not necessarily. All chess players want to become this sort of hard-to-deal with chess machines. But how can you do that? Is it necessary to memorize thousands opening lines and theoretical endgames?

Yury Markushin
06.22.2011
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Yury Markushin
06.22.2011

Tactics is something that can make you an overall better player. That’s why I recommend practicing tactics problems on daily basis. Tactical blunder is the factor that very often decides the game. It does not matter how weak or strong chess player you are, solving tactics problems is something that can keep your skills sharp and win games.

There are many places on the internet where you can solve tactics problems. One of the high quality resources that can help with your daily tactical needs is the Chess-Problems.org.

Yury Markushin
06.07.2011
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Yury Markushin
06.07.2011

Oddly enough, many non-chess players (and even beginner players) believe that ability to play chess well is something inherent. They believe that no matter what they do, they will not be able to progress.

It’s absolutely false. Of course, genetics plays some sort of role in becoming a good chess player, but if you’re not aiming at becoming a grandmaster and the chess world champion, it shouldn’t bother you at all. The truth is this: an average person who trains and plays chess consistently will beat any chess gifted genius who doesn’t practice playing. You’re surprised? You ask me how to improve your chess? The answer is pretty simple and complex at the same time.

Yury Markushin
06.01.2011
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Yury Markushin
06.01.2011

There are 468 million people that are using Android powered smart-phones in the World in 2011. There is a high chance that many of these millions are occasional chess players, since chess is the most popular over the board game. Laptop may not be always accessible, but what if you want to play chess anyway? If you have an Android capable phone, playing chess on it is not a problem. What android chess program should you choose to spice up your day? If you are curious, read on. I’m certain this review will help you to decide: what is the chess software you really want for your Android phone.