Latest Posts - Page 146

Yury Markushin
02.25.2011
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Yury Markushin
02.25.2011

If you play chess regularly, there is a high possibility that you would have to play a game in the lost position. Does not matter how strong or weak chess player you are, you will have to defend the “weak” end of the board one day. There are plenty of information available (in various chess bibles and online recourses) on how to play chess, but they rarely talk about playing chess in the lost positions. They assume that if position is lost the game is over. It’s not quite true. The point of my little writing is to prove that there are exceptions to this rule. If you apply some basic principles you may be able to join that “exception” group, replacing you “0” with “1/2” or even “1” on the score sheet.

Yury Markushin
02.17.2011
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Yury Markushin
02.17.2011

As you can see from the title, today’s topic of our discussion is a bit unusual. First of all, what do I mean by coming back from a chess vacation? It means, you haven’t played chess for some significant amount of time but decided to change your life and come back. Sometimes people have to take a break from playing/improving their chess.

There is an infinite number of reasons why that may happen: exotic vocation, job schedule, school work, travels arrangements, winning a million dollars lottery (some people would play more in this case) may interfere with chess. After we’re done with all these “important” things we may feel that it is a good time to start playing our favorite sport again. How to do it again?

Yury Markushin
02.11.2011
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Yury Markushin
02.11.2011

I already talked about the subject of elo rating but decided to expend previous article with more information and some technical details about elo chess rating system. This article is not recommended for people who take statistics/predictions way too seriously since this information can ruin their chess results. So read it at your own risk!

The ELO chess rating system is a method of estimating the strength of two players. ELO system isn’t an IQ score. ELO rating does not show how smart you are, how well your memory is, how fast can you calculate chess variations or recognize chess patterns (it is a topic of a separate discussion, how well the IQ score reflects all of the above).

Yury Markushin
01.28.2011
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Yury Markushin
01.28.2011

I have written previously about 7 deadly mistakes every novice player makes. Today I have decided to extend this list even further and to add 5 other typical “problematic choices” that amateur chess players make to have their chess life more difficult and stressful.

If you find yourself in some of these how-not-to-play examples you should feel good since by fixing it you can improve your play and win more games. I should feel accomplished, since the time I spend writing it is worthwhile and I helped other players to get better at chess.

Yury Markushin
08.24.2010
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Yury Markushin
08.24.2010

I have previously talked about evaluating of chess position. Today’s topic is a little different even though it may seem to be similar: analyzing chess game. The main difference is that we’ll concentrate on a whole game analyzes which occurs immediately after the game, in contrast, to the evaluation of a chess position which happens over the board, during the game.

Before telling you how to analyze a chess game, I’d like to tell you how not to. Do not plug a game into a computer engine to see where it went wrong. In fact, you will learn hardly anything that way. It is like solving the tactics problems by using a Fritz engine.

Yury Markushin
08.08.2010
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Yury Markushin
08.08.2010

I have written a How to get better at chess: a guide for all levels a while ago and have received quite a few responses. I want to say a couple of words about that article. First of all, it is impossible to write a precise guide for each rating level, especially for a player rated below 1000. The reason is that it’s difficult to distinguish between different studying guidelines for players rated say 500 and 800, that’s why I have combined all players below 1000 into one, a single section in my new guide.

Yury Markushin
08.02.2010
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Yury Markushin
08.02.2010

The clock is a very important aspect of practical chess. You may be a very good chess player but lose a lot of games because you get short on time and make blunders as a result. In order to perform at your best, a good time management technique is required. What do I mean by that? Let’s say you have 75 minutes with 5-second delay for 40 moves and 30 minutes for the endgame (it is a typical time control for many tournaments). At this time control a player should spend just under 2 minutes per move for the first 40 moves.

WGM Natalia Pogonina
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Yury Markushin
05.10.2010

There is nothing that disgusts a man like getting beaten at chess by a woman.

Charles Dudley Warner
Playing in mixed events is enjoyable since it allows one to learn more about chess and psychology, and to improve more rapidly. So why, one might ask, are women often segregated? The problem is that most organizers don’t support female players by introducing special prizes for women. Therefore, each time you play in a mixed event, you have to be ready to bear expenses and earn nothing, which is not what a chess pro is looking for. As a result, most strong female players prefer to participate in tournaments that can offer them a chance to gain a title and win a prize.

Yury Markushin
03.24.2010
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Yury Markushin
03.24.2010

I have been asked many chess questions lately via my Facebook and Twitter accounts. Here is a list of selected questions with answers which maybe interesting for the general chess audience. If you have your own questions to ask you can send it on my email, Facebook or Twitter.

I have also received questions on languages other than English; I wasn’t able to reply, so please use English when sending me questions.

You will ask me why did I post 12 Q&A as a separate topic and not in FAQ? Because this are mostly practical chess related questions, where one wants to improve. You may have the same question as other chess players, so read on…

Yury Markushin
03.06.2010
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Yury Markushin
03.06.2010

Two Bishop Mate is another checkmate that seems problematic for club-level chess players to implement, even though it should not be.

I have previously written about Knight + Bishop Checkmate, which is much more subtle, but no doubt very important to know.

The main idea of checkmating with two bishops is occupying the center with the bishops, using the King to force the opponent’s King to the edge of the board and checkmating.