Dynamic Anti-Catalan Repertoire with GM Davorin Kuljasevic

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Dynamic Anti-Catalan Repertoire with GM Davorin Kuljasevic
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GM Davorin Kuljasevic, from the Modern Chess camp, is here with his latest course Dynamic Anti-Catalan Repertoire—where he reveals the most effective replies to refute White’s some of the most common ideas in the Catalan opening.
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What’s the best way to dismantle your opponent’s play?

Push them out of their comfort zone!

If he thrives in tactical play, create a closed position instead.

If he is an endgame master, delay trade-offs as long as possible.

Talking about the Catalan opening, what do you think a Catalan player wants?

A Catalan player usually blossoms in static positions that usually deliver endgames with a winning advantage.

That’s your cue.

When you are playing against a Catalan player, you need to take him into “dynamic” waters.

How to do that?

GM Davorin Kuljasevic, from the Modern Chess camp, is here with his latest course Dynamic Anti-Catalan Repertoire—where he reveals the most effective replies to refute White’s some of the most common ideas in the Catalan opening.

HINT: all them start with 1…Nf6!

In this 3-hour video training, he takes special care in covering not only the different lines, move by move, but also the specific order in which they can be carried out. He teaches you how to nullify White’s advantages in the opening and play for a win instead.

Here’s what you are going to learn:

  • Delayed d-pawn. White plays Nf3/c4/g3 but does not play d2-d4 yet. He wants to keep his options open. Kuljasevic shows you why d4! is the best reply to this. Black grabs a bigger piece of the center and goes for the initiative right away.
  • Immediate d-pawn. White shows his hand right away and plays d2-d4 after c2-c4. Black should challenge White’s c-pawn with a d7-d5 push. Instead of letting White initiate the capture or going for a closed position, what should Black play next? 4…dxc4!
  • Black’s atypical c7-c6 push. A rare move indeed. The idea is to push b7-b5 and either support Black’s alive c-pawn or challenge the piece that captured it. What if White responds with Ne5? Let Kuljasevic show you what to do next. Do note that the wrong move can wreck your position.
  • White plays 1.d4…2.Nf3. Ah, so the c4 move has not been played yet. Black should instantly challenge the c4-square with d7-d5, preceded by Nf6. And go for a Semi-Slav setup with the light-squared bishop on f5.
  • White’s queen to b3. In the closed Semi-Slav setup, White might want to pressurize Black’s position with an ambitious 8.Qb3. Is there anything to worry about? Your “sensei” for this course says no. Instead, Black should challenge it with Qb6 and even exchange it in certain cases. (When should you exchange off the queens? Check Chapter 6.)

The Catalan is one of the most potent closed positional openings there is for White. Used extensively by Vladimir Kramnik during the World Chess Championship matches of 2006, 2007, and 2008, along with Gerry Kasparov and Victor Korchnoi at the London Candidates Tournament in 1983.

If you want to play and win against it as Black, you need something that is equally potent.

That’s where this training comes in.