Positional Nimzo-Indian Repertoire 1 and 2 with GM Mihail Marin

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GM Mihail Marin from the Modern Chess camp is here with his brand-new 6-hour video training on the Nimzo-Indian Defense for Black. Not only does he cover 40+ variations in this opening but also goes through each one of them in great detail.
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Bobby Fischer stunned Spassky with it, smashing him in just 27 moves in game 5 of the 1972 World Championship.

Carlsen became World Champion with it, beating Anand as Black in just 28 moves in the critical 9th game.

When Black wants to play strategically super-complex middlegames, the Nimzo-Indian is what they go for. It is often THE choice of champions at the elite level.

What Black is saying in this opening is, “I am going to put pressure on your center (especially, the e4-square) and might sacrifice my bishop for your knight to damage your pawn structure.”

White has got a LOT of replies to that… 4.f3, 4.g3, 4.Qc2, 4.e3… and Black has got flexibility and fast development on his side.

If the Dragon or the Grunfeld seems too tactical for your appetite and you want a more idea-based opening that provides for strategic counterplay against White 1.d4, the Nimzo-Indian is the right choice for you.

Want to play like a grandmaster? Let a grandmaster teach you.

GM Mihail Marin from the Modern Chess camp is here with his brand-new 6-hour video training on the Nimzo-Indian Defense for Black.

Not only does he cover 40+ variations in this opening but also goes through each one of them in great detail.

If you want to whip out the Nimzo-Indian against your unassuming 1.d4 opponent in the next tournament…

Here’s what you are going to learn:

  • White bides time with 4.e3. White does not challenge Black’s ideas right away. Instead, plays a quiet, developing move. Problem? Black has got infinite options now, each with its own micro-challenges. Learn which one to go for next.
  • White keeps it flexible. What if White goes for Nf3 on the fourth move? A modernized version of the Rubinstein system. Remember those Karpov-Kasparov matches? White is keeping his options open. What should Black do? Go 4…b6.
  • White’s 4.e3…6.a3…8b3 setup? This line in the Rubinstein is the safest choice for White. However, Black’s light-squared bishop usually comes to a6, and the dark-squared bishop retreats… What about the rest of the Black’s pieces though?
  • White improvises 4.Qc2 with… 4.Nf3, followed by 5.Qb3. White wants to induce a defensive move by White like 5…a5 or 5…Qe7. Not so fast, Mr. White. Black responds back with 5…c5 that makes White’s queen a bit uncomfortable. What’s next?
  • White plays with fire. White gets ambitious and he plays 4.f3 not to give away center control so easily. But it takes away the knight’s square, right? Learn how to exploit this as Black with a c5-b5 pawn break and punish White for sacrificing on piece development.

The Nimzo-Indian is flexible, dynamic, and offers Black a good chance of equalizing then winning the game.

And this is your chance to become a MASTER at this opening.