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understanding chess weaknesses
WGM Raluca Sgîrcea, IM Renier Castellanos
02.16.2019
WGM Raluca Sgîrcea, IM Renier Castellanos
Getting a good positional understanding is an important step to improving your play and becoming a stronger player. Studying the basic themes, seeing the positional masterpieces played by the great players and solving many exercises can help you in this direction. One of the most important concepts, which appears in probably every single game is weaknesses and understanding how to identify and use them in your advantage. Not only this, but you have to also try to create as little as possible in your position and know how to get rid of them if you have any.
Training Tips
10 Steps for Getting Good at Chess – Fast
Yury Markushin
10.10.2016
Yury Markushin
Do you know how to get better at chess? How do you become a strong chess player? Everyone wants to learn a secret recipe that will help getting good at chess fast! Should you work on tactics? How much time should you be spending on endgames? Do you have to play over-the-board chess? We will answer these and many more questions and will give you a simple 10-step plan outlining the most important steps you should take for getting good at chess.
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10 Chess Patterns Every Player Should Know
Yury Markushin
10.31.2016
Yury Markushin
We always hear strong players talking about the importance of recognizing chess patterns. What do they mean by that? What are these magical chess patterns we need to know and recognize? If you’re confused don’t worry, after reading this article you won’t be. You will understand exactly what chess patterns are and will learn 10 very important chess patters that every chess player should know.
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5 Most Useful Chess Skills You Can Learn in 5 Days
WGM Raluca Sgîrcea, IM Renier Castellanos
08.07.2017
WGM Raluca Sgîrcea, IM Renier Castellanos
In order to improve at chess every player must work hard and invest some daily time and effort. There are many things you can work on, from openings to endgame, tactics and the middlegame. However, there are  few basic skills one must develop and constantly train. The consistency of training is perhaps one of the single most important things a chess player can do in order to be successful. Similarly to exercising in a gym, working on your game is a process. The improvement will be gradual, but definite if you keep applying yourself. Here are the 5 most useful chess skills you can learn in just 5 days!

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Opening Tips
Main Ideas of The Reti Opening
WGM Raluca Sgîrcea, IM Renier Castellanos
02.29.2016
WGM Raluca Sgîrcea, IM Renier Castellanos
The Reti Opening, starting with the moves 1.Nf3 2.g3 has always been a second or third opening choice for white. It's rarely seen at club level and it is historically considered to be harmless and dull compared to the most popular 1.d4 and 1.e4. However, this is a very superficial judgment.
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Playing Against The Trompowsky: A Standard Response
WGM Raluca Sgîrcea, IM Renier Castellanos
09.29.2015
WGM Raluca Sgîrcea, IM Renier Castellanos
Many times we face the Trompowsky variation as black during tournament or casual online blitz. It is certainly an awkward opening, especially if black does not know what he is doing. The Trompowsky has been employed by many attacking players, such as Nakamura, Grischuk, Mamedyarov and many others.  
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King’s Indian Attack vs. the Dragon
WGM Raluca Sgîrcea, IM Renier Castellanos
02.15.2017
WGM Raluca Sgîrcea, IM Renier Castellanos
We are always on the look to learn new opening ideas to surprise our opponents in the future. It doesn’t really matter whether it is an opening that we play or not; we see someone playing something and if it’s enough interesting for us we take a deeper look and use it in the next opportunity we have. That’s how it works at competitive level. In this article we are going to draw your attention to a short and easy to learn recipe against the Hyper-Accelerated Dragon that was played recently by the International Grandmaster Eduardas Rozentalis.
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